Managing at best maceration and micro-oxygenation in the winemaking process

Micro-oxygenation and maceration are two very important phases of winemaking that influence the stability and quality of the wine. Both processes are related to the content and characteristics of the polyphenols present in wine. Monitoring the evolution of these compounds over time is a fundamental tool in the hands of the winemaker to better manage winemaking processes and guarantee the quality of the finished product.

Download the article “Managing at best maceration and micro-oxygenation in the winemaking process” to find out which are the most effective methods to monitor the parameters that influence these processes and carry out the necessary operations to obtain both a stable and quality product.

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Download the article “The evolution of sugars and of wort density during beer fermentation”

When does the fermentation process end? How much sugar do you need to add in the priming phase? Researchers at the CDR chemical lab “Francesco Bonicolini” conducted a study on brewing with the aim of:
• understanding which is the best method to determine the end of the fermentation process;
• determining the residual sugar concentration in order to avoid problems in the priming phase.
For this purpose we studied the evolution of fermentable sugars as well as the variation of wort density during fermentation.

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The importance of proper yeast recovery: Methods for determining the quantity of live cells (viability) and their vitality

The reuse of yeasts requires particular attention to recovered cell efficiency, in order to ascertain just how much sediment is required to achieve suitable fermentation for the type of beer you are looking to produce.
Determining viability, the number of live cells in yeast sediment available for reuse, is a solution to this problem, but it will be not enough.
It is important to assess recovered yeast in terms of VITALITY.
Vitality analysis indicates yeast cell health, enabling us to ascertain to what extent cells are capable of feeding and reproducing so that alcoholic fermentation can take place.
provides results in acidification power.
Therefore the CDR BeerLab® method for determining is simple to use, provides rapid results, is reliable and usable by any operator directly at the brewery on the production line.
Check out the key points about yests vitality in brewing process

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Download the article Complete control of vinification in a single analysis instrument

Is setting up a quality control laboratory in the winery a determining factor for wine quality? What are the potential difficulties in carrying out quality control in the winery? What are the solutions for simple vinification control? For more information on this topic, download the article COMPLETE CONTROL OF VINIFICATION IN A SINGLE ANALYSIS INSTRUMENT.

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Analyses of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) and gluconic acid for optimum management of alcoholic fermentation

As is known, due to global warming, we are witnessing increasingly adverse and difficult weather conditions. The rise in average temperatures is in fact causing an increase in the frequency of hot and dry vintages alternating with rainy and cool years. In difficult climatic conditions, in addition to the usual analysis of sugar, total acidity, pH and acetic acid, yeast assimilable nitrogen and gluconic acid are the fundamental parameters available to the oenologist to better manage the fermentative process, an essential starting point to obtain a quality wine. What are yeast assimilable nitrogen and gluconic acid? How can these analyses affect alcoholic fermentation? For further information on these important themes you can download the article: VINIFICATION IN THE ERA OF GLOBAL WARMING

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